Project Description

JMT WILDERNESS RESTORATION

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation plans to assess the environmental impacts at the most heavily-used campsites and collection points along the JMT Backcountry, and fund the necessary
restoration work and mitigation efforts.

JMT WILDERNESS RESTORATION

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation plans to assess the environmental impacts at the most heavily-used campsites and collection points along the JMT Backcountry, and fund the necessary
restoration work and mitigation efforts.

Protecting wilderness, its natural processes, and the renewable source of clean water for millions of downstream users, is inextricably linked to the management and rehabilitation of highly-used wilderness destinations.  The John Muir Trail and its interconnecting trail network is that wilderness. Approximately 220 miles long and 20 miles wide, it covers roughly 2,800,000 acres of land. It encompasses the heart of the Sierra Nevada snowpack that serves 25 million people in their communities and businesses, and the agriculture and stock of the Central Valley. The protection and restoration of the JMT wilderness ecosystem is essential to the health and well-being of so much.

The Foundation would like to develop a plan for repair and restoration of the adverse environmental changes at the high-use locations along the full length of the John Muir Trail network, the most frequently-used access trails and at the main re-supply sites. For many years, people have noticed illegal campsites and fire pits, rutted and branching trails, tracked meadows, poorly buried waste, and accumulating debris in an expanding human footprint. The data is daunting. Yosemite National Park reports that approximately 50% of all campsites in wilderness were illegal, damaging water sources, meadows and habitat, and watershed. It has taken constant annual efforts to find and restore these campsites, repair surrounding damage and drive percentages lower. Only with constant vigilance can wilderness be restored and protected from the relentless human footprint.

Based on ground observations, we have identified and mapped the most heavily-used campsites and collection points along the JMT Backcountry where visitors meet in mass, pitch tents and spend time. Working with the federal land managers for cross-regional efficiencies and consistencies, the JMTF will begin to develop plans for restoration and mitigation, funding any recommended restoration work or mitigation strategies as much as our donated funds allow, focusing on the most urgent needs first. This effort is long-term, complicated and costly.

Our first effort is a Pilot Program. We are collaborating with Yosemite National Park and Yosemite Conservancy to extend their on-going wilderness restoration program into the Ansel Adams Wilderness in Inyo National Forest. This area has long needed comprehensive repair and restoration, from Donohue Pass to Thousand Island Lake to the Shadow Lake/ Ediza Lake corridor. With adequate funding, this will result in a restoration and mitigation plan ready for ground-work to begin in August/September 2020. We will keep you posted on progress in organizing this effort.

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Protecting wilderness, its natural processes, and the renewable source of clean water for millions of downstream users, is inextricably linked to the management and rehabilitation of highly-used wilderness destinations.  The John Muir Trail and its interconnecting trail network is that wilderness. Approximately 220 miles long and 20 miles wide, it covers roughly 2,800,000 acres of land. It encompasses the heart of the Sierra Nevada snowpack that serves 25 million people in their communities and businesses, and the agriculture and stock of the Central Valley. The protection and restoration of the JMT wilderness ecosystem is essential to the health and well-being of so much.

The Foundation would like to develop a plan for repair and restoration of the adverse environmental changes at the high-use locations along the full length of the John Muir Trail network, the most frequently-used access trails and at the main re-supply sites. For many years, people have noticed illegal campsites and fire pits, rutted and branching trails, tracked meadows, poorly buried waste, and accumulating debris in an expanding human footprint. The data is daunting. Yosemite National Park reports that approximately 50% of all campsites in wilderness were illegal, damaging water sources, meadows and habitat, and watershed. It has taken constant annual efforts to find and restore these campsites, repair surrounding damage and drive percentages lower. Only with constant vigilance can wilderness be restored and protected from the relentless human footprint.

Based on ground observations, we have identified and mapped the most heavily-used campsites and collection points along the JMT Backcountry where visitors meet in mass, pitch tents and spend time. Working with the federal land managers for cross-regional efficiencies and consistencies, the JMTF will begin to develop plans for restoration and mitigation, funding any recommended restoration work or mitigation strategies as much as our donated funds allow, focusing on the most urgent needs first. This effort is long-term, complicated and costly.

Our first effort is a Pilot Program. We are collaborating with Yosemite National Park and Yosemite Conservancy to extend their on-going wilderness restoration program into the Ansel Adams Wilderness in Inyo National Forest. This area has long needed comprehensive repair and restoration, from Donohue Pass to Thousand Island Lake to the Shadow Lake/ Ediza Lake corridor. With adequate funding, this will result in a restoration and mitigation plan ready for ground-work to begin in August/September 2020. We will keep you posted on progress in organizing this effort.

VIEW ALL PROJECTS