Project Description

JMT Standing Stone Marker

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation proposes to mark the starting point  of the JMT in Yosemite Valley with an etched “Standing Stone”  for people to photograph and enjoy!

JMT Standing Stone Marker

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation proposes to mark the starting point  of the JMT in Yosemite Valley with an etched “Standing Stone”  for people to photograph and enjoy!

 

     Most scenic trails have a marker or sculpture erected at the starting and ending points of the route for people to photograph and enjoy as they start out. Group photographs of backpackers, day hikers or park visitors are wonderful ways to capture the moment. With a plaque to lay out the story of a trail’s history, this enhances everyone’s appreciation of what lies before them. We believe the John Muir Trail deserves the same.

Over the long history of the JMT, people have chosen to start out in many different places. To settle on any single starting point in today’s Yosemite Valley, our trails team consulted a number of sources, including early editions of the Starr Guides, the various maps made during exploration and construction, many articles and journals that were published over the decades. In the end, the foundation wanted to honor the spirit of the JMT hike, looking to the tradition of the Sierra Club “High Trips”. It was at the LeConte Memorial Lodge (now called the Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center) where many people gathered, often supported by mules and horses, before setting out to join the trailhead climbing up alongside the Merced River past Vernal and Nevada Falls and onward to Tuolumne Meadows.

The YCHC is an iconic stone structure that began its life in another spot. The Lodge was originally constructed at the base of Glacier Point in Curry Village and was dedicated on July 3, 1904. Its design reflected its surroundings, steep granite walls, rough hewn stone, and the muted palette of Yosemite Valley. The architecture is described as Tudor Revival and featured a steep pitched gable roof, local granite stone laid in a rough-course ashlar pattern, and exposed hammer beams. supported by scissor trusses. In 1919, it was moved westward to its current location across from Housekeeping Camp where Ansel Adams served as its summer custodian. The Lodge was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987.

It seems altogether fitting to mark this spot as the JMT’s authentic starting point. For the design, we settled on a native granite “Standing Stone”, an historic feature of interest to many early Sierra Club members and JMT explorers. Several of the early members, including the LeConte family, used such stones as burial headstones.

Help us build and install this commemorative JMT “Standing Stone” Marker!!

                             VIEW ALL PROJECTS

Most scenic trails have a marker or sculpture erected at the starting and ending points of the route for people to photograph and enjoy as they start out. Group photographs of backpackers, day hikers or park visitors are wonderful ways to capture the moment. With a plaque to lay out the story of a trail’s history, this enhances everyone’s appreciation of what lies before them. We believe the John Muir Trail deserves the same.

Over the long history of the JMT, people have chosen to start out in many different places. To settle on any single starting point in today’s Yosemite Valley, our trails team consulted a number of sources, including early editions of the Starr Guides, the various maps made during exploration and construction, many articles and journals that were published over the decades. In the end, the foundation wanted to honor the spirit of the JMT hike, looking to the tradition of the Sierra Club “High Trips”. It was at the LeConte Memorial Lodge (now called the Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center) where many people gathered, often supported by mules and horses, before setting out to join the trailhead climbing up alongside the Merced River past Vernal and Nevada Falls and onward to Tuolumne Meadows.

The YCHC is an iconic stone structure that began its life in another spot. The Lodge was originally constructed at the base of Glacier Point in Curry Village and was dedicated on July 3, 1904. Its design reflected its surroundings, steep granite walls, rough hewn stone, and the muted palette of Yosemite Valley. The architecture is described as Tudor Revival and featured a steep pitched gable roof, local granite stone laid in a rough-course ashlar pattern, and exposed hammer beams. supported by scissor trusses. In 1919, it was moved westward to its current location across from Housekeeping Camp where Ansel Adams served as its summer custodian. The Lodge was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987.

It seems altogether fitting to mark this spot as the JMT’s authentic starting point. For the design, we settled on a native granite “Standing Stone”, an historic feature of interest to many early Sierra Club members and JMT explorers. Several of the early members, including the LeConte family, used such stones as burial headstones.

Help us build and install this commemorative JMT “Standing Stone” Marker!!

VIEW ALL PROJECTS