Campsite / Habitat Study2018-07-16T10:12:27+00:00

Project Description

CAMPSITE / HABITAT STUDY

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation would like to support an extension of a campsite density & habitat study in a comprehensive assessment of human and equestrian traffic on the JMT Corridor.

CAMPSITE / HABITAT STUDY

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation would like to support an extension of a campsite density & habitat study in a comprehensive assessment of human and equestrian traffic on the JMT Corridor.

In October 2017, a research project was started by the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Geological Survey to develop sustainable Best Management Practices for resolving camping resource impacts at high use/high impact locations along the Southern California part of the Pacific Crest Trail.

The agencies collaborated with our partner non-profit, the Pacific Crest Trail Association, in this undertaking as well as the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute and researchers from Virginia Tech University. Included among the research locations were two areas on the John Muir Trail at Thousand Islands Lake, above, and at the Mt. Whitney Portal trail.

The Foundation would like to apply the protocols of this study to assess the full length of the John Muir Trail, as well as its network of access trails and its main re-supply sites. Foundation board members Cris Chater (known on the JMT as “Strider”), John Dittli and Elizabeth Wenk are working now to identify and map the most heavily-used access trails and areas where hikers congregate along the JMT. Once marked on a map of the JMT (the “JMT Corridor Map”), this will be a good basis to begin formulating such a study.

Given the concentration of recreational focus on the John Muir Trail by all classes of backpackers and hikers, such a study would assist in the understanding of both urgent and long-term restoration and conservation strategies.

The Foundation would support with funding and volunteers any effort recommended by the study or advocated by the federal agencies.

In October 2017, a research project was started by the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Geological Survey to develop sustainable Best Management Practices for resolving camping resource impacts at high use/high impact locations along the Southern California part of the Pacific Crest Trail.

The Foundation would like to use the protocols of this study to assess the full length of the John Muir Trail, as well as its network of access trails and its main resupply sites. Given the concentration of recreational focus on the John Muir Trail by all classes of backpackers and hikers, such a study would assist in the understanding of both urgent and long-term restoration and conservation strategies.