“Hot Spots”2018-07-16T09:55:06+00:00

Project Description

A MAP OF THE JMT CORRIDOR
“Hot Spots”

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation will use its updated GIS map to identify and mark the areas of highest human impact along the JMT, its network of access trails and at the re-supply sites. The JMT Corridor Map highlighting these “hot spots” will be an internal reference tool for assessing restoration and conservation needs of the wilderness areas affected.

A MAP OF THE JMT CORRIDOR
“Hot Spots”

OBJECTIVE: The Foundation will use its updated GIS map to identify and mark the “hot spot” areas of highest human impact along the JMT, its network of access trails and at the re-supply sites, to assess the conservation efforts needed for the wilderness.

It is one goal of the JMT Foundation to support the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service in their overall maintenance and stewardship of the broader areas impacted by people hiking on the JMT, not just simply the main trail itself.

We recognize that the federal agencies must also consider the network of support trails, re-supply sites and lakegroupings along its path. We are calling the encompassed region the “JMT Corridor” and are attempting to locate and mark on a map the high-impact areas “hot spots” based on what can be seen on the ground. This map will be enormously useful in discussing priorities and overall conservation efforts for the JMT!

The Foundation’s board members, Cris Chater (“Strider”), John Dittli and Elizabeth Wenk will study a new updated JMT map and identify areas they believe may present problematic management challenges. Some form of cross-hatching or shading will be used to mark those areas for review and consideration by the federal agencies. We will add notes to further describe the conditions on the ground in those specific areas.

The following diagram and chart provides an illustration of the JMT’s main access trails and re-supply points, which could form the basis of the JMT Corridor map.

The JMT Corridor includes these main access trails from the eastern Sierra:

Cottonwood Pass
New Army Pass
Whitney Portal
Shepherd Pass Trail
Onion Valley Trail
Bullfrog Lake Trails
Kearsarge Pass Trail
Taboose Pass Trail
Bishop Pass
Piute Creek Trail and Piute Pass
Duck Pass
Mammoth Pass
Network of Trails at Reds Meadow & Devils Postpile National Monument

From the west side of the Sierra, backpackers often use these trails to access the JMT:

Bubbs Creek Trail
Sixty Lakes Trail
Woods Creek Trail
Muir Trail Ranch Trail
Sallie Keyes Cut-Off Trail
Bear Creek Trail
Bear Ridge Trail
Goodale Pass Trail
Mono Creek Trail

The main re-supply sites for thru-hikers on the JMT are:

Onion Valley Trailhead
Muir Trail Ranch
Vermilion Valley Resort
Reds Meadow
Tuolumne Meadows

Once completed, the Foundation will share the JMT Corridor Map with the NPS and the U.S. Forest Service for discussion and review. We hope it will be useful as reference for any urgent problems that should be addressed. It could also help prioritize and focus future efforts the agencies may choose to pursue for conservation and restoration of the broader JMT Corridor. The Foundation is committed to providing funds and volunteers to support the agencies in their efforts.

It is one goal of the JMT Foundation to support the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service in their overall maintenance and stewardship of the broader areas impacted by people hiking on the JMT, not just simply the main trail itself. The following diagram and chart provides an illustration of the JMT’s main access trails and resupply points, which could form the basis of the JMT “Hot Spots” map.

The JMT Corridor includes these main access trails from the eastern Sierra:

Cottonwood Pass
New Army Pass
Whitney Portal
Shepherd Pass Trail
Onion Valley Trail
Bullfrog Lake Trails
Kearsarge Pass Trail
Taboose Pass Trail
Bishop Pass
Piute Creek Trail and Piute Pass
Duck Pass
Mammoth Pass
Network of Trails at Reds Meadow & Devils Postpile National Monument

From the west side of the Sierra, backpackers often use these trails to access the JMT:

Bubbs Creek Trail
Sixty Lakes Trail
Woods Creek Trail
Muir Trail Ranch Trail
Sallie Keyes Cut-Off Trail
Bear Creek Trail
Bear Ridge Trail
Goodale Pass Trail
Mono Creek Trail

The main re-supply sites for thru-hikers on the JMT are:

Onion Valley Trailhead
Muir Trail Ranch
Vermilion Valley Resort
Reds Meadow
Tuolumne Meadows

Once completed, the Foundation will share the JMT Corridor Map with the NPS and the U.S. Forest Service for discussion and review. We hope it will be useful as reference for any urgent problems that should be addressed. It could also help prioritize and focus future efforts the agencies may choose to pursue for conservation and restoration of the broader JMT Corridor. The Foundation is committed to providing funds and volunteers to support the agencies in their efforts.